Condom 411: What escorts should know about condoms and their use

Even though your clients may protest the wearing of the love glove, both you and they know it’s a necessary evil that keeps everyone safe rather than sorry. But, you can lessen the “evil” by increasing your knowledge about the condom, its use and some tips to make it more exciting or comfortable for your client.

Condom use goes back many, many centuries, with the oldest claims coming from cave paintings that are 12,000 to 15,000 years old. Few references were found during the Roman Empire days, due to the rise of Catholicism, but the use of condoms has been prevalent throughout history otherwise. The condom, however, was very different from today’s versions in its pre-XIX century forms. Made from chemically-treated linen or animal tissue (usually intestine or bladder), the condom was much less comfortable and somewhat less effective, although still a good solution for contraception and syphilis reduction. For many years, our sexually-active ancestors relied on glan covers, that covered the head of the penis, but they realized these were ineffective for the prevention of disease. When rubber was invented, it wasn’t long before the first rubber condoms were manufactured in 1855, and they gained popularity quickly.

Still a taboo subject for society, the first condom advertisement in the U.S. appeared in the New York Times in 1861.

However, society wasn’t quite ready to accept the mainstream manufacture and use of condoms. The moralist hypocrites influenced federal and state legislators to pass laws prohibiting the manufacture and sale of condoms in 1873. But manufacturers found loopholes around the laws, as did consumers.

When latex was invented in 1920, Young’s Rubber Company produced the first latex condom using the Trojan brand. Soon, the latex condom became the norm and was also standard issue for all U.S. military members in 1931. Because the condom industry had never been regulated for quality assurance, the Federal Drug Administration created mandates for condoms in 1940 and seized 864,000 faulty condoms during its first month of regulation. Since then, regular standards have been in place to ensure that condoms are reliable and safe for use.

14 things an escort should know:

  1. Always buy latex condoms. Although there are several types of condoms (lambskin, polyurethane, etc.), only latex condoms have been proven to provide nearly 100 percent protection against STDs and HIV. Escorts shouldn’t take risks with their health or safety (or their clients’) by selecting condoms that will not protect them.
  2. Fit is important. Clients who wear condoms that do not fit properly run the risk of spreading STDs, if they are infected. Overall, there are three sizes of condoms that escorts may choose to use with their clients: standard, contoured and large (which will fit penises 2 mm larger than the “norm”). Although these standard sizes fit most, escorts should shop around to find the best options. Condoms that are too small may break, allowing exposure to infection as semen spills out and direct skin-to-skin contact is made. Much the same goes for a condom that is too big and slips off during intercourse. Escorts should ensure that a condom is the right size by examining whether it reaches the base of the penis. If it doesn’t, it is too tight. A condom that is too tight may not only break during intercourse, but it also reduces your client’s sensations. Giving a client a condom that is too big may make him feel inadequate, in addition to running the risk of it sliding off during sex. The average penis is 7 inches long, which means that most clients will fit in average-sized condoms. However, penis size may vary by up to an inch and several millimeters in girth. As you gain experience, you will be able to quickly judge the size of condom your client requires.
  3. Shop around. Do some experimenting with various brands and varieties of condoms. Once you find a brand you like, stick with it and buy several types and sizes, including extra-lubricated and ribbed. Your clients may not like the idea of having to wear a woody hoodie, but they will be much more pleased when you have several options from which they can choose. Consider buying condoms in bulk: it’s usually cheaper and much more discreet.
  4. Store your condom stash in a dry, cool area. Put them in a container where they are loosely stored. Ensure that condoms do not exceed their expiration dates when you prepare to use them. As you go through your supply, discard any that have expired. Additionally, any condoms that have been exposed to excessive heat (sitting in a hot car, for example) or have gone through the washer (from being forgotten in your pocket) should be thrown away.
  5. Always examine the condom wrapper before using its contents. Any wrapper that displays extreme wear, appears brittle, or is sticky and discolored is a sign that the condom may not be any good. Additionally, the condom wrapper should have a pocket of air in the package. If it doesn’t, it’s an indication the wrapper has a hole in it, and the condom may be punctured, too.
  6. Put the condom on before any intimate contact is made. The only way to avoid the spread of STDs is to put a barrier between you and your client before skin-to-skin contact is made. Don’t remember in the middle of intercourse to put the condom on. Make it a priority to put it on as soon as your client develops an erection.
  7. Make sure the condom is right-side out. A condom is like a sock: it has a right side and a wrong side. Unroll the condom one-half inch or so to see which way it naturally unrolls. If it doesn’t unroll easily, it is likely inside out. Flip it around and begin again. If a condom just doesn’t want to unroll at all, discard it and try a new one.
  8. Leave space at the tip. Many condoms have a reservoir tip built into their design, which allows for a bit of space at the end for sperm and ejaculate. However, some do not. As you are helping your client put on his condom, pinch the tip slightly, allowing a bit of the condom to extend past the penis head. Not only does this leave room for semen after your client climaxes, but it also reduces the amount of air bubbles in the condom. Air bubbles can cause the condom to break during intercourse.
  9. Use lube. Water-soluble lube helps to reduce friction when using condoms, making the experience more pleasant for both you and your client. Many people think that the type of lube you use doesn’t matter, but they are wrong. You should always use water-soluble varieties; other types may break down the condom, causing it to break. NEVER use: Vaseline, petroleum jelly, massage oils, Crisco, butter or hand creams. Good brands of lube to consider include: K-Y Jelly, ID Glide, Slippery Stuff, Foreplay and Astroglide.
  10. Clean up is essential. Knowing how to clean up after using a condom is important so as not to spill the contents. Your client should withdraw immediately after he ejaculates. If he waits until he goes limp, the contents of the condom can spill out into the vagina, potentially causing an infection. After withdrawal, your client should carefully pull the condom off and wrap it in a tissue to discard in the trashcan. Your client may also choose to tie it off at the top. Do not flush it down the toilet; some sewer systems do not tolerate condoms well. Only use a condom once. A condom should never be used for both vaginal and anal intercourse. And, you should never utilize a condom with more than one person (such as during a threesome).
  11. Use a condom on your sex toys. Of course, vibrators and other accessories should be cleaned thoroughly after use with clients, but it’s also a smart idea to protect yourself during the encounter by putting a condom on a toy, especially if you and your client are both taking turns enjoying it.
  12. Uncircumcised clients can enjoy sex fully with a condom on. Some clients who are uncircumcised may complain that sex is uncomfortable with a condom. Don’t allow them to talk you into unprotected encounters. Simply pull the foreskin back prior to putting on the condom. They experience no more discomfort than clients who are fully circumcised.
  13. Never use your teeth to open the condom wrapper. Although your clients may get a kick out of it when you do this, it’s not a good idea. You could easily tear the condom as you rip the package open.
  14. Put the condom on your client so that he enjoys wearing it. Because many clients don’t particularly look forward to wearing a condom, you can help make it fun for him. Open the condom wrapper ahead of time, so it’s ready as soon as your client gets his erection. Put a couple of drops of lube in the condom, which will help increase the sensations at the head of the penis. Dab a bit of lube onto your lips and suck the non-spermicidal side of the disc into your mouth, creating a small nipple tip inside your mouth. Wrapping your lips over your teeth, put your mouth (with the condom) over the head of your client’s penis. Push your lips against the ring of the condom, and lower your mouth down around his shaft, sliding the condom on. Push it down as far as you can with your mouth, and use your hand to unroll it the rest of the way. Proceed with the pleasure by continuing with the oral sex.

Everyone needs a condom every now and thenMany escorts have questions about the best condoms to use for particular purposes. Here is a brief rundown:

  • Best condoms for lasting longer: Some clients may have trouble with premature ejaculation. The type of condom you use can help. Choose a condom with a special additive in the tip to help decrease sensations temporarily. Durex Performax Condoms and Trojan Extended Pleasure Condoms are excellent choices.
  • Best condoms for pleasing a woman: If your client is extremely concerned about pleasing you, select a condom that is ribbed, studded or warming. One brand to try is Trojan Her Pleasure Warming Sensation Condoms.
  • Best condoms for the larger-than-average penis: Some clients are just BIG! Buy condoms meant for larger penises, including Lifestyles KYNG Condoms or Trustex Extra-Large Lubricated Condoms.
  • Best condoms for the smaller-than-average penis: While some clients are larger, others are a bit on the smaller side. Condoms to use with your smaller clients are Iron Grip Snugger Fit Condoms.
  • Best condoms for blowjobs: The best condoms for blowjobs feature a looser fit at the tip and along the shaft, while still fitting snugly at the base of the penis. Condoms that provide more wiggle room allow for more pleasure, especially if you’ve added a drop or two of lube to the inside before putting it on. Flavored condoms or Lifestyles Pleasure Tipped Condoms are good choices for oral sex.
  • Best condoms for anal sex: Always choose lubed condoms for anal intercourse. If your favorite brand of condoms have an “extra-safe” variety, that is a good pick, too, because condoms are more apt to break during anal sex. Some to try are Lifestyles Ultra-Lubricated Condoms. A great lube option is Sliquis Sassy Booty Formula.