Safety tips for the escort-client relationship

The relationship between escort and client is one of a subtle drive to maintain power and control. The time spent together can be extremely enjoyable and lucrative for both but can also be riddled with occasional discomfort if a few simple courtesies aren’t kept in mind.

As the hired professional, it is the escort’s responsibility to define these parameters, and applying these tips will help keep you both safe and extremely satisfied.

  1. Protect your private information by using a PO Box as the address on your driver’s license, or get a second legal identification card that does not include your home address: you don’t need a client knowing where you live. Use a phone-card or an internet-created account such as skype to initially contact your clients, and consider having a private cell-phone for further encounters that cannot be traced back to your home address. This provides a peace of mind just in case a client tries to get too personal, so you don’t have to worry about complications outside the arranged time spent together.
  2. When booking an appointment with a new client, gather their basic information and do a background check. Get their full name (including middle), personal phone number, email address, state of registration and any references from other escort experiences they may have. While new clients may not have references from other escorts, their names should be cleared from national blacklist sites and basic legal background checks. Also, asking for a few personal details to include in a google search may further guarantee that your client is who they present themselves to be and therefore poses less of a threat to you physically or legally. Be wary of new phone numbers / email addresses. While it is common for a client to be reluctant in giving you their personal information, they should be easily consoled that this is for your mutual safety and enjoyment and is a procedure only necessary before your first meeting.
  3. Make it easy for your clients to know what to expect in the first few moments of your time together, and give yourself a routine to follow to ensure your safety from that point:
    • Upon arriving and after friendly introductions, check the client’s identification and verify it with the information given upon booking the appointment.
    • If arranged, call a friend or service so that they know you are safe and what time you’ve met your client. They should also be called up leaving to ensure your safety and help to verify the time spent together.
    • The client should leave your compensation in clear sight so that you may pick it up without money passing between your hands. Put this in a (preferably) zippered compartment of your bag and keep it with you at all times, verifying the amount at a discreet time and when alone. If the client attempts to shortchange you of the agreed upon fee, don’t fight back – just leave immediately. This points to a lack of understanding in the client that may bleed into other areas of you arrangement and put you in danger.
    • Check the space to make sure no one else is present, having specified to the client beforehand that your time together is only for the two of you.
    • It’s a classy move for the client to have beverages on hand, a variety of alcoholic and non-alcoholic for both of you to enjoy. Specify that these bottles should be sealed when you arrive so that you can see them being opened in front of you. Slipping drugs into a drink is too easy of a way for you to be taken of guard.
    • After these points, excuse yourself to a restroom so that you both have a moment to collect yourselves. Keep your personal belongings with you at all times, so that there is not one shred out doubt that either of your things have been tampered with.
  4. When possible, use a driver or taxi to get you to a client, and make it clear to the client that someone is outside waiting for you (even if they are not).
  5. Take with you only what you need. Bring enough cash for a taxi if necessary, but avoid bringing any greater amounts or any identification that reveals your address. Unfortunately, some clients have space-issues and may borderline on stalker-ish activities.
  6. Assess the public surroundings to make sure the time booked with you is private and respectful: is the room you’re walking towards quiet or rowdy with loud music? Is the space clean? Can the doors be locked from the inside but not from the outside?
  7. When meeting a client at a hotel, get their name and room number and confirm this with the hotel privately. If they’ve registered with a fake name with the hotel or given you one, this is a huge warning sign that should something go wrong between you, the client’s identity will not be able to be confirmed.
  8. If there is the tiniest bit of doubt that your client is an undercover police officer, take extra precautions upon your first meeting. Go a bit early and wait in the parking lot, looking for anyone checking out the space that might be there to alert someone inside.
  9. Be aware of warning signs that something may not be quite right with a client. If they refuse to show you identification, insist on writing a check when you request cash, don’t give you a personal phone number to communicate with etc., there’s just too much gray area should something illegal happen between you. If they start to get angry or irritable, counter them with gentleness and try to light-heartedly change the subject, but don’t be afraid to scream or start throwing things at walls / out windows to catch the attention of those nearby if you feel you’re in danger.
  10. Use the same common sense you would in any other compromising position. Watch your alcoholic intake and be aware of your surroundings. Taking a basic self-defense class is a comfort that in the chance you’ll be in a physically compromised position, you can defend yourself with confidence.

Sometimes practice does make perfect, and it will take a few tries before these steps naturally fall into a routine and you almost don’t notice them. Being safe will become second nature and you’ll be able to enjoy the company of your clients without directly thinking about your own safety. Just remember that you are the one who needs to maintain a position of subtle power, and the time is yours for the taking.