Help the camera capture you: prep steps for stellar escort photographs

There are generally two kinds of social marketing photographs: those that hit the subject from just the right light, at just the right angle, in just the right moment, and those that contain even one element of distraction that give more of a blurry, general impression than a come-hither invitation.

Which would you prefer when someone’s viewing your image for the first time?

Your marketing photos should be a welcoming and accurate representation of who you are and what makes you, you! Especially in situations when you’re meeting someone for the first time, enough information about who you are and what you offer should be easily obtained from the handful of images you share.

Succinctly put, as agents tell actors, your ‘headshot’ should look like you on a good day.

Here are some preparations that will put you on the right path for posting phenomenal photos.

  1. What makes you unique? Try to single out what makes you unique amongst the competition out there. This isn’t limited to merely how you look. What part of your body feels incredibly attractive to you? What features do you try to naturally accentuate? What about your personality will attract the kind of clientele you’re looking for? Pick a manageable number of these traits and make sure to focus on them when getting your photos taken. This will help clarify what you’re trying to capture and how you will be represented when the photos are posted together.
  2. Dress for your body. Even in the social escort and massage industry, there are those who try to hide troublesome areas with loose clothing—avoid this if at all possible. Instead, look for dresses and shirts that cinch at the waist, or corsets and lingerie that accentuate your curves1. With sexy or revealing clothing, avoid any layers, ruffles or added details such as bows. These distort the line of your body. Rather, keep lines clean and true to your shape.
  3. Stick to solid, primary colors. In photographs, everyone looks better in royal colors (strong blues, reds, purples, greens, yellows, no pastels or neon). Neutrals only work best under certain lighting, so if you’re unsure as to how much control you’ll have over it, avoid anything that doesn’t contrast sharply with your skin color. Gold and silver only look good on certain skin colors (usually those with darker skins and brown-toned tans). If you want a little shimmer but are paler in complexion, go with a blue, black or red that has some sparkle to it. In the modeling world, white, sadly, is a no-go. Patterns take away from what you want people to be looking at—you! Show a bit of your feisty side through your facial and physical expression instead of incorporating animal prints, for example!
  4. Take a few days to prepare. Alcohol, dehydration, poor diet and lack of sleep contribute to looking puffy and tired in photos, and you want to grasp onto that “me on a good day” thing. So take three or four days of sobriety and good sleep to heart, and you’ll look that much more refreshed and capable come click time.
  5. Pick your environment(s). If you’re going to be indoors, pick a space that’s as clean, natural and neutral as possible. Yes, you want to look all come-hither on your couch. But do you need those poorly framed personal photos or knick-knacks in the frame? Try to make sure the colors you’re wearing contrast with those around you. If shooting outside, keep in mind that white light in the late afternoon shoots best—lots of sun produces shadows that can actually be unflattering. And if there’s a lot going on around you—water, sand, a tiled floor or wallpapered wall—try to blur them out while shooting or editing. Make sure the focus of your picture is you!
  6. Experiment with angles. Depending on your ensemble and lighting, a straight-on photo may work for you, and is most likely the best bet for a primary photo (the first one a potential client sees). But why not mix it up and really seduce the camera and therefore your clientele? The slight jutting forward of a hip, the tiniest elongation of your neck, the stretch of one of you arms to the sky—all of these and many more will help create unique shot. When taking photos of your face, either have your photographer get you from an angle slightly higher than centered, or tip your chin down a tiny bit and look up into the camera. Do the same thing with altering the direction of your face, progressively turning your chin to one side or the other while keeping your eyes to the camera.
  7. Similarly, experiment with levels. Standing, laying, kneeling, leaning; getting good shots in various positions shows that you’re natural in any environment.
  8. Be comfortable—look comfortable. Yes, the way your body drapes off the edge of a couch or by a window may technically look alluring. But if you’re feeling self-conscious or in any amount of pain, the camera will pick up on it. If you’ve collected your best wardrobes and set yourself in a comfortable environment, your facial and body expressions should be relaxed so that your personality and energy can shine through. Remember, these photos are capturing the things about you that you love about yourself—so celebrate them!

Customers who read this article also read How to make the most out of your photos.